OpenSolaris ZFS replication

I’ve had this goal for quite some time now, every since my employer went with Sun X4540 storage systems to serve as our data storage for backup applications. The goal was to handle data replication at the ZFS file system level, removing the need for application-level awareness of the file system replication.
A couple products from Sun seemingly accomplish this, one being ZFS via the ‘zfs send/recv’ function.
I will describe concepts and provide a basic script that be used to frequent volume snapshotting and replication.

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FreeBSD NFS performance and OpenSolaris

While setting up and testing our Sun X4540 OpenSolaris NFS server, I noticed that our FreeBSD NFS clients were having severe performance issues while writing to the server. After a few days of digging around, I came across some ancient posts (circa 2005) on the FreeBSD-performance mailing lists describing similar problems.
Here is a brief explanation of how an NFS write can happen:
Assuming we have a generic NFS server, and a generic NFS client mounted over NFSv3/TCP, for every file write you issue an FSYNC. This will signal the NFS server to write to disk immidiately what it has received from the client, and once it has written to disk it will acknowledge to the client that the write was successful so the client can send more data.

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SNMPTT Zabbix trap handler

I’ve wondered how to integrate standard SNMP traps into Zabbix for some time, many of our systems are Dell’s with OpenManage installed. OpenManage supports sending SNMP traps to a monitoring station who receives them and then takes defined actions.
The components we will use to accomplish this are net-snmp, Zabbix, and SNMPTT. Net-SNMP will provide the trap receiver daemon, and if you choose to configure, a SNMP daemon as well for passive polling. The SNMP trap daemon will listen for incoming traps sent by hosts on your network, translate the trap from installed MIBs, and send the translated message to Zabbix using the zabbix_sender program.

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